Drinking Small Amount of Alcohol Helps Prevent Cognitive Decline

According to a study, heavy drinking tends to have deleterious impacts on cognition in older persons, but modest drinking appears to have protective advantages.

Drinking Small Amount of Alcohol Helps Prevent Cognitive Decline
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The study employed data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey's common database, which comprised 1,926 people aged 45 who were followed up on until 2006. All of the participants were asked to fill out a questionnaire about their alcohol consumption habits, including how often they drank, how much they drank, and what kind of alcohol they drank.

In men, none, light (84 g/wk.), light-to-moderate (84.01–168 g/wk.), moderate-to-heavy (168.01–336 g/wk.), and high (336.01 g/wk.) alcohol consumption was categorized; in women, none, light (42 g/wk.), light-to-moderate (84.01–168 g/wk.), moderate-to-heavy (168.01–336 g/wk.).

A selection of items from the modified Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status were used to assess cognitive function, with the lowest quintile serving as the cutoff point for cognitive impairment.

The average age of the population was 56.91 years, with men accounting for 51.66 percent of the population. In terms of drinking habits and cognitive scores, there were sex-specific variations (p0.001). In total, 135 men and 237 women suffered from cognitive impairment.

In men, excessive drinking and nondrinking both increased the risk of cognitive impairment (a OR, 2.19, 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 1.59–3.00 and [a OR], 1.54, 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 1.21–1.96, respectively; p<0.001).

Abstinence and moderate drinking, on the other hand, were linked to a higher risk of cognitive impairment in women than light drinking (a OR, 1.54, 95 percent CI, 1.16–2.03 and a OR, 1.75, 95 percent CI, 1.08–2.85, respectively; p<0.001).

 

Source: Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis 2021;doi:10.1016/j.numecd.2021.07.023

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