Traditional Japanese Diet Reduces Breast Cancer Incidence and Mortality, Study Suggests

A Japan study suggests, based on the results of a longitudinal analysis, that a traditional Japanese diet or TJD seems to reduce breast cancer incidence and mortality.

The traditional Japanese diet or TJD mainly consist of a staple food such as – steamed rice or soba, ramen, or udon noodles, soup (miso, vegetable, or noodle), main dish (fish, seafood, tofu, or natto with small amount of meat, poultry, or egg), and side dishes (vegetables, wild plants, seaweed, and raw or pickled fruit).

Photo: Traditional Japanese Diet | InStyleHealth


Researchers evaluated the longitudinal correlation between TJD score and the incidence and mortality of breast cancer in an ecological study. Experts obtained food supply and breast cancer incidence and mortality by country from an international database.

The TJD score by country was calculated from nine food groups, with the total score ranging from -9 to 9: higher scores indicated greater adherence to a traditional Japanese diet.

Experts analyzed longitudinal correlations of interaction between TJD score and fiscal year on breast cancer incidence and mortality in 139 countries with populations of 1 million or more. They also evaluated the correlations utilizing four linear mixed-effects models with different adjustment covariables.

Throughout 1990 – 2017, many countries with high traditional Japanese diet (TJD) scores revealed lower distributions of breast cancer incidence and mortality.

With longitudinal analysis utilizing a linear mixed-effect model controlled for socioeconomic and lifestyle covariables, the interaction between TJD score and fiscal year revealed a significant association with a decrease in breast cancer incidence and mortality.

The researchers said that the traditional Japanese diet is considered one of the important factors of health and longevity in Japanese people, while noting that breast cancer is still the most common cancer among women across the globe.

 

Source: Eur J Clin Oncol 2021;75:929-936

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