Adults with High Weight-Adjusted Handgrip Strength Are at Low Risk of Hypertension, Study Reveals

A study reveals that middle-aged and older individuals with high weight-adjusted handgrip strength are at low risk of developing hypertension.

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Experts utilized data from the Tianjin Chronic Low-grade Systemic Inflammation and Health or TCLSIH cohort study and involved 8,480 adults aged 40 years or older. The participants’ handgrip strength were assessed using a hydraulic handheld dynamometer.

Throughout a median follow-up of 4 years (6 years maximum), the incidence rate of hypertension was 70 per 1,000 person-years.

When handgrip strength was measured in relation to weight, individuals in the higher vs lowest reference quartiles had a lower risk of hypertension.

With the adjusted cox proportional hazards regression models, the hazards ratios or HRs for incident hypertension correlated with decreasing quartiles of weight-adjusted handgrip strength were 0.66, and 0.84.

Each-unit increase in weight-adjusted handgrip strength was correlated with a risk reduction of 83%. Outcomes were similar in both men and women.

Muscular strength’s role has been increasingly recognized in the prevention of chronic disease. Current data indicate a correlation between handgrip strength and incidence of hypertension among the middle-aged and older population.

 

Source: Maturitas 2021;doi:10.1016/j.maturitas.2021.06.002

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