Vitamin D Deficiency Exacerbates Risk of Worsening Lung Function in Men, Study Reveals

A recent South Korean medical study reveals that vitamin D deficiency may exacerbate the risk of worsening lung function even in apparently healthy men.


Photo: Lungs | InStyleHealth


The research involved 68,457 visibly healthy middle-aged Korean adults with an average age of 37.7; of which 36,759 were men. The subjects underwent spirometry for the measurement of lung function and were eventually grouped into quartiles. Serum Vitamin D levels were monitored from blood samples using a competitive immunoassay.


Deficiency of Vitamin D was defined in this study as levels <20 ng/mL, with common rates of 69.2% and 80.6% in men and women, correspondingly. In the total sample, deficiency was associated with body mass index (BMI), education level, physical activity, total cholesterol, and insulin resistance.


Occurrence of vitamin D deficiency differs across quartiles of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC), but only in men; no such intervention was reported in women.


Using the multiple regression analysis, study found that in the total sample, both FVC and FEV1 interacted significantly with the odds of exhibiting vitamin D deficiency.


However, in the bottom quartile of both lung function parameters were 10% more likely to also have vitamin D deficiency.


Stratifying the subjects by sex revealed that this was likely driven by the interaction between the lung function and vitamin D deficiency in men. Nonetheless, neither lung function marker was linked to Vitamin D status among women. For complete details of the study, click here.

 


Source: Eur J Clin Nutr 2021;75:501-512

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